Trail

Hisle Farm Park

Lexington, KY
Length: 2.00 mi.
Type: Loop

About This Trail

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Hisle Farm Park is about 280 acres of rolling fields. The trails are wide mowed paths that are also utilized as horse trails. Most of the time we have been there, there haven’t been any horses, but at the bottom of this there will be trail etiquette and safety points for sharing trails with horses. These trails are one of the few non-paved trails in Lexington that allow dogs (leashed).

Once you turn off of Briar Hill road, you will follow the gravel road to the end where it’s a large dead end that you can park at (historically trailers park on the right side and cars are supposed to park on the left side closest to the barn. There are technically 2 trails: a 1-mile loop and a 2.5-mile loop. However, the loops can be combined and the 2.5-mile loop can be shortened or lengthened as needed. The easiest way to start the trails is to head out at the end of the parking area by the port-o-pot with the barn on your left. You will see a trail leading straight. Follow this trail until it stops at a metal fence that closes off a bridge over the railroad tracks. From here you can turn left for the 1-mile loop or turn right for the 2.5-mile loop. The 1-mile loop has large pieces of art work created out of wooden boards throughout the loop. There are some slight hills, but nothing to steep. It wanders through the fields until you come to an option that you can either turn left and head back to the barn, or go straight and this leads to a small pond with a bench in front of it. The pond has a path around it and is often filled with red winged black birds. Continue along and you will soon be back at the barn.

The 2.5-mile loop is hillier in spots, but does follow the railroad tracks a bit more than the other direction, which is always cool when a train comes through (which is rare). There is a larger pond along this path that has a picnic table and benches near it. There is also a “secret” pond that people often fish at towards the end of the 2.5-mile loop that is hidden in trees (the group of trees on your right when driving in, across from the smaller pond).  These trails have lots of signs of wildlife if you keep your eyes open and are full of butterflies at the right time of year.  Just be warned, this trail is a tick heaven and it is strongly recommended to use tick prevention.

Of note: Hikers yield to horses

Tips for meeting a horse on the trail:

  • Stop and calmly greet the rider (horses need to hear you speak in order to help them understand you are human)
  • Ask if you are ok where you are or await instructions
  • Do not hide or remove backpack
  • Stand quietly and allow the horse to pass
  • Do not try to touch the horse

https://www.lexingtonky.gov/hisle-farm-park

https://www.visitlex.com/listing/hisle-park/6642/

Hisle Farm Park = 280 acres of beauty #FreshAirFriday https://www.lexingtonky.gov/hisle-farm-park

Posted by City of Lexington, Ky on Friday, February 10, 2017

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Trail Features

Surface type Dirt
Carrier needed No
Stroller friendly No
ADA accessible No
Water fountains Yes
Bathrooms No
Cell reception Excellent
Pet friendly Yes
Nearby convenience store No
Camping Nearby No
Emergency support
within 5 miles
No

Trail highlights

Mud Puddles, Picnic Area, and Wildlife Viewing

Old Barn
Ponds
Wildlife
Native grasses
Art

Fee & Parking Details

Fee : $0.00

There is a large gravel parking area in front of the old barn at the end of the gravel road. It is free to park. If staying past dusk, when the gates close, park on the side of the loop in front of the front gate (when star watching).

Trail Contributor

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Keira has always been an active outdoors person, either through her love of hiking or riding horses. She is a mom of 2 boys, a pre-schooler and baby. She and her husband, Jon, can be found exploring trails in Red River Gorge as well as traveling the US and trying to visit all the National Parks with their boys. They have a family goal of section hiking the Sheltowee Trace Trail with their boys.