Trail

Iron Goat Trail

Skykomish, WA
Length: 6.00 mi.
Type: Loop

About This Trail

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This trail runs along the old railroad grade that used to take trains up into the cascades. It is 6 miles round trip with 700 feet in elevation gain, but only the lower 3 mile trail is ADA and all terrain stroller friendly. This hike is remarkably beautiful, with amazing mountain views on one side, and the bones of old railroad tunnels and snowsheds on the other. This hike provides many points on interest for little hikers, such as bridges, small waterfalls, creeks, and boardwalks, and the promise of the train at the end will keep them motivated. Make sure you stop to read all the interpretive signs along the way, but use caution when near the tunnels as they are unsafe to enter.

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Trail Features

Carrier needed No
Stroller friendly Yes
ADA accessible Yes
Water fountains No
Bathrooms No
Cell reception None
Pet friendly Yes
Nearby convenience store No
Camping Nearby No
Emergency support
within 5 miles
Yes

Trail highlights

Creek / River, Natural Play Area, Picnic Area, Shaded Hike, Viewpoint, Waterfall, and Wildlife Viewing

There are several collapsing train tunnels that are very interesting to look at. Please stop and read the interpretive signs, but please do not go inside! They are still collapsing and very dangerous.

As a side note, take a moment to read up on the Wellington disaster of 1910. The Wellington ghost town can be accessed from the Iron Goat interpretive trailhead or the Martin trailhead, but it will add four miles roundtrip to your journey.

Fee & Parking Details

Fee : $5.00

Parking requires a Northwest Forest Pass or a day pass purchased at the ranger station.

Trail Contributor

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Hello! I am a former Journeyman Wireman turned stay-at-home mom to my four beautiful children. After growing up in the hot desert of Las Vegas, we decided to make a change and move to beautiful Snohomish County WA. I found my community here through Hike it Baby, and I now work to facilitate that for others. If you’re ever in my neck of the woods, come join me on a hike!