Trail

Willow Heights Trail

Brighton, UT
Length: 2.20 mi.
Type: Out & Back

About This Trail

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The Willow Heights Trail to Willow Lake is a short hike from Big Cottonwood Canyon Road up near Brighton, just east of the Silver Fork Lodge. The trail is narrow and steep in the beginning and may be difficult for young walkers. Older kids and babies riding in carriers could do it with no problem. The trail flattens out as you enter a wide meadow with wide views of the surrounding mountains. Once you get to the lake, there is lots of open space to lay down a picnic blanket and enjoy a nice lunch. The trail is accessible in all four seasons, including in the snow. The fall colors are incredible starting in late September and the wildflowers are equally beautiful in the summer; usually mid-July. In the winter, snowshoes are recommended after recent snow fall. If the trail is icy, it’s not recommended, especially for kids. All of Big Cottonwood Canyon is a watershed canyon, so no swimming or wading in the lake and no dogs.

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Trail Features

Surface type Dirt
Elevation gain 629 ft.
Carrier needed No
Stroller friendly No
ADA accessible No
Water fountains No
Bathrooms No
Cell reception Spotty
Pet friendly No
Nearby convenience store Yes
Camping Nearby No
Emergency support
within 5 miles
Yes

Trail highlights

Lake, Viewpoint, and Wildlife Viewing

Willow Lake is small but really beautiful, especially in spring, summer and fall when it reflects the surrounding aspen trees.

We’ve seen moose on this hike more than a few times. There are usually ducks and/or geese around the lake too.

The trail is steep at the beginning, and could be difficult for young walkers, especially when going downhill. Trekking poles are recommended for stability.

There are no restrooms or water fountains at the trailhead.

Big Cottonwood Canyon is a watershed canyon, so no dogs are allowed, and there is no swimming or wading in the lake.

Fee & Parking Details

Fee : $0.00

There is no designated parking lot for this trail. Parking is along the side of the road, just east of the Silver Fork Lodge. The trail is marked with a large rock with the trail name carved into it. It’s easy to miss when driving there. During good weather, you may see other cars parked along the side of the road.

Trail Contributor

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Alex is an artist and graphic designer who runs her own little business from home while she’s momming it with her two school-aged boys. She’s a California native and transplant to the Salt Lake Valley where she’s completely fallen in love with living so close to the mountains. She loves hiking, camping, travel, soccer, photography and cooking. She geeks out over history, especially art history, loves getting lost in a great novel, and she started practicing taekwondo the year she turned 40. She’s also a Lifetime Girl Scout, and she loves sharing her love for travel and the outdoors with her kids.

Weather

Trail Map

Getting There

From I-15, take the exit onto eastbound I-215/Belt Route. Take exit 6 onto UT-190 toward 3000 E from the second-to-righthand lane. Keep left and follow signs to 6200 S. Turn right onto UT-190/6200 S/Wasatch Blvd. Turn left onto UT-190/Big Cottonwood Canyon Rd. The the trailhead is less than a quarter-mile after you pass the Silver Fork Lodge. There is only parking on the side of the road and the trail is marked by a large, engraved boulder.

About The Guide

Hike it Baby Family Trail Guide is an online resource to help families with children source trails that little legs can hike and parents can feel comfortable with. Hike details are sourced and have been hiked by families who participate in our community. Our contributors do their best to give you all the details they can, but if something is missed, you can reach out to the contributor and offer suggestions for them to add to make it a better trail description for all. This guide was built with a generous 3-year partnership with L.L Bean. Like Hike it Baby, L.L Bean believes that helping get families into nature from birth on is key to healthier, happier communities.